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The Health Show Episode #9 – How Adrenal Stress Impacts your Health

The Health Show Episode #9 – How Adrenal Stress Impacts your Health

Wow .. what a great turn up and interest in our latest Health Show. We had the largest audience to-date, therefore it’s not hard to believe alot of people are suffering out there from a range of adrenal stress symptoms.

Adrenal fatigue is estimated to affect around 80 percent of people in the world. This was one of the manyAdrenal Stress - KinesiologyZoneany  reasons we choose Adrenal Stress as our topic for this Health Show. A lot of people feel deflated, frustrated and overwhelmed with symptoms and a lot of time they don’t understand why they are happening to them. But we think there’s hope.

It’s our opinion adrenal fatigue and stress can be managed and solved with some techniques we use in Systematic Kinesiology, by testing for nutritional deficiency and reviewing your diet.

Watch our most recent show to learn how to recognize and address Adrenal Stress –

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The Health Show was filled with some much information today and the half hour flew by so quickly, we didn’t get a chance to demonstrate the iris contraction test.This is an easy test that you do at home or with a friend.

This measures your body’s stamina in response to light stimulation. If your stamina is decreased, this test plus your overall symptoms may indicate that your adrenals are having difficulty supporting you through stressful events.

Here’s what you’ll need to take the test:

  • Weak (not too bright) flashlight or phone light
  • Mirror
  • Dark room

Test Directions:

In a dark room, sit or stand in front of a mirror for about a minute to allow your eyes to adjust to the light. “Then shine a flashlight across one eye (not directly into it) from the side of your head. Keep the light shining steadily across one eye and watch in the mirror with the other. You should see your pupil (the dark circle in the centre of the eye) contract immediately as the light hits your eye. This occurs because the iris, a tiny circular muscle composed of small muscle fibers, contracts and dilates the pupil in response to light. Just like any muscle, after it has been exercised beyond normal capacity, it likes to have a rest.

The pupil normally remains contracted in the increased light, the pupil will not be able to hold its contraction and will dilate [open back up] despite the light shining on it. This dilation will take place within 2 minutes and will last for about 30-45 seconds before it recovers and contracts again. Time how long the dilation lasts with the second hand on the watch and record it along with the date. After you do this once, let the eye rest. If you have any difficulty doing this on yourself, do it with a friend. Have a friend shine the light across your eye while both of you watch the pupil size.   (Source: Adrenal Fatigue: The 21st Century Stress Syndrome)

To find out if you are suffering from Adrenal Fatigue and to get tested visit your local Systematic Kinesiologist.

We hoped you enjoyed our latest show and we would love your feedback.

Mark your diary – On Wednesday 19th July on our next Health Show we will be covering digestive problems and the leaky gut. We hope to see you there and if you have any questions just post in the comment below.

To book a place on our Health RoadShow click here – www.KinesiologyZone.com/roadshow

10 days to Thrive – bed time – Day FOUR

Our 10 days to thrive challenge – Bedtime

Systematic Kinesiology 10 day challenge to thrive

 

 

Are you a bedtime procrastinator?

Do you fight with yourself to go to bed, and then struggle to get up in the morning?

Systematic Kinesiology Bedtime Procrastinator

Bedtime procrastination is failing to go to bed at the intended time.  Easy peasy right? Yes how many times have you not gone to bed when you said you would even though there was no outside influence or circumstances stopping you from doing so (only yourself)?   Bedtime procrastination is unique because usually people will procrastinate to put off something they find undesirable, sleep is not undesirable.  We enjoy it, we feel better after a good sleep.

It is not so much not wanting to sleep, but rather, not wanting to stop what you are doing.  You lose track of time looking at your smart phone, tablet, watching TV, or even doing chores, even though you will regret it in the morning.  I think it’s because as children we thought being sent to bed meant we were going to miss out on something.  Yet as adults we still rebel against being told what to do!

Sleep is very important for your body to recharge and heal itself.  People actually sleep better when they are well rested rather than when over tired.  Ever been so tired and yet frustratingly can’t get to sleep?  If you’re looking for the ideal time to turn the lights off, it’s 10.30pm.  This comes form Traditional Chinese Medicine.  Every meridian system which is connected to an internal organ has a two our window of focus time.  7am – 9am is stomach meridian time (which is when we “should” generally eat our breakfast).  11pm to 1am is our Triple Warmer focus time – which is connected to our Thyroid and Adrenals.  If you have ever experienced a “second wind” – you start to feel more energy late at night – that’s what we want to avoid.  Going to bed before 11am, so 10.30, will give your body the best opportunity to recharge and restore its energy.

Your happiness throughout the day and your energy levels are all related to the amount of sleep you get. Most adults need between 7 to 9 hours per night. Women actually need 1 hour extra than men.

Tips to get to bed on time Set yourself a time for bed to regulate your body clock

    1. Finish up on the internet at least an hour before bed
    2. Don’t wait until you feel tired and sleepy
    3. Have a bedtime routine (wind down to sleep time)
    4. Avoid alcohol and heavy food late in the evening
    5. Avoid over stimulating the brain with electronic screens (no phones in bed)
    6. If you can’t sleep, get up and leave the room then try again
    7. Daily exercise helps promote a better night’s sleep
    8. Make sure your bed and pillows are comfortable but supportive

 

Today’s challenge – maybe you’re not a bedtime procrastinator, but there’s something else you procrastinate over.  Make a commitment to yourself to go to bed early – make it a lovely ritual tonight.  Treat yourself to looking after you.

Look forward to hearing what you’re committing to over on the event page. Are you a bedtime procrastinator?

Join us over here: https://www.facebook.com/events/547394058759986/

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GnMtsEBudXM